Selenops\according to Crews 2011

From Species-ID
Jump to: navigation, search
Notice: This page is derived from the original publication listed below, whose author(s) should always be credited. Further contributors may edit and improve the content of this page and, consequently, need to be credited as well (see page history). Any assessment of factual correctness requires a careful review of the original article as well as of subsequent contributions.

If you are uncertain whether your planned contribution is correct or not, we suggest that you use the associated discussion page instead of editing the page directly.

This page should be cited as follows (rationale):
Crews S (2011) A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean. ZooKeys 105 : 1–182, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2011-06-14, version 10985, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Selenops%5Caccording_to_Crews_2011&oldid=10985 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

Citation formats to copy and paste

BibTeX:

@article{Crews2011ZooKeys105,
author = {Crews, Sarah C.},
journal = {ZooKeys},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean},
year = {2011},
volume = {105},
issue = {},
pages = {1--182},
doi = {10.3897/zookeys.105.724},
url = {http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/724/abstract},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2011-06-14, version 10985, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Selenops%5Caccording_to_Crews_2011&oldid=10985 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean
A1 - Crews S
Y1 - 2011
JF - ZooKeys
JA -
VL - 105
IS -
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.105.724
SP - 1
EP - 182
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2011-06-14, version 10985, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Selenops%5Caccording_to_Crews_2011&oldid=10985 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/zookeys.105.724

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Crews2011ZooKeys105">{{Citation
| author = Crews S
| title = A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean
| journal = ZooKeys
| year = 2011
| volume = 105
| issue =
| pages = 1--182
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/zookeys.105.724
| url = http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/724/abstract
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2020-12-04

}} Versioned wiki page: 2011-06-14, version 10985, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Selenops%5Caccording_to_Crews_2011&oldid=10985 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Araneae
Familia: Selenopidae

Name

Selenops Latreille, 1819Wikispecies linkPensoft Profile

Diagnosis

The genus Selenops can be distinguished from other genera of the family Selenopidae by the ventral leg spination of legs I and II. All members of this genus have three pairs of ventral spines on the tibiae I and II, and two pairs of ventral spines on the metatarsi I and II, denoted as 3–2. Spination for other genera is as follows: Amamanganops Leg I 4–3, Leg II 5–3; Anyphops 4 to 7 pairs on legs I and II; Garcorops 4–3; Godumops 7–4; Hovops 2–2; Karaops Leg I 5 to 6, Leg II 0–4, or unpaired; Makdiops Leg I 4–4, 3–3, or 3–2, Leg II 4–4, 4–3, 3–3, or 3–2; Pakawops Leg I 7–5 Leg II unknown; Siamspinops Leg I 11–15, Leg II 7–13.

Description

Total length of males 4.00–13.00 mm, of females 5.00–18.00 mm; body yellowish to brownish to greyish, mottled with darker markings; legs with bands (Figs 180–181,191). Cephalothorax: Carapace in most specimens with dark mottling, dorsoventrally flattened, wider than long with distinct cephalic region, thoracic region laterally convex, fovea longitudinal with radiating grooves, hirsute, clypeus low. Eight eyes outlined in black, six eyes in the anterior row, straight or slightly recurved, two eyes in the posterior row. PLE usually the largest (Fig. 184), ALE usually the smallest. Sternum circular to ovoid with notched posterior projection extending between coxae IV. Chilum absent. Chelicerae geniculate, robust; patura setose with distinct lateral condyles. Fang large, cheliceral promargin with 3 teeth and retromargin with 2 teeth. Labium as wide as, or wider than long, rounded anteriorly, truncate posteriorly; endites ectally convex, subparallel with terminal scopulae. Female pedipalp with claw. Abdomen: Longer than wide, ovoid, extremely dorsoventrally flattened, slightly truncate posteriorly; mottled, sometimes with setal tufts along the posterior margin giving the tip of the abdomen a festooned appearance (Figs 179, 187, 190). One pair of book lungs and single tracheal spiracle near spinnerets. Six spinnerets, anterior pair adjacent; colulus absent. Legs: Laterigrade, long, tarsi with two claws, in most species the prolateral claw is toothed and the retrolateral claw is smooth, however both claws can also be toothed or not. Claw tufts present. Tarsal scopulae present in most species. Trichobothria present on all leg segments. Legs, especially femora, ringed in black in most species. Tibia and Metatarsus I and II with strong spines, in a 3–2 pattern, respectively. Copulatory organs: Male palpus complex, retrolateral tibial apophysis 2 or 3 branched, dorsal branch longer than ventral branch in most species; embolus long, median apophysis 1 or 2 branched, at least one branch sclerotized in most species. Conductor typically large and with a spine- or spur-like apex. Epigyne with lateral lobes or not, spermathecal openings at the caudal end of a median guide or in a median pit, many species with epigynal pockets. Internal ducts variable, spermathecae large and heavily sclerotized in most species, some species with posterodorsal fold.

Nomina dubia

Franganillo (1926)[4] described a subspecies of Selenops radiatus, Selenops radiatus fuscus, from Cuba, and mentions Selenops radiatus occurring in Cuba. However, it is clear that Selenops radiatus, or any subspecies, does not occur anywhere in the New World. Additionally, he provided no illustrations with his descriptions. Thus, Selenops radiatus fuscus is unrecognizable and should be considered a nomen dubium.

Distribution

Tropical and subtropical areas of North, South and Central America, Africa, Madagascar and Asia.

Composition

Currently there are 35 valid species of Old World Selenops and 85 recognized species of New World Selenops.

Key to species of Selenops found in the North America, Central America and the Caribbean, exclusive of Cuban endemics * denotes Selenops actophilus, Selenops debilis and Selenops nesophilus, which can be very difficult to separate morphologically owing to apparent variation (see text). The key was made using the type specimens.
(Terms used are illustrated in Figs 1–2 for females and 3–4 for males)



Survey of species Species are arranged by molecular phylogenetic similarity (see Crews and Gillespie 2010[5]) or, for those species in which genetic data was not available, by similarities in the genitalic characteristics.

Taxon Treatment

  • Crews, S; 2011: A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean ZooKeys, 105: 1-182. doi

Other References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Latreille P (1819) Articles sur les araignées. Nouveau Dictionnaire d'histoire Naturelle Paris Ed. II, Paris, 22.
  2. MacLeay W (1839) On some new forms of Arachnida. Annals of Natural History 2: 1-14.
  3. Benoit P (1968) Les Selenopidae africains au Nord du 17e parrallèle Sud et reclassement des espèces africaines de la famille (Araneae). Revue de Zoologie et de Botanique Africaines 77:113-141.
  4. Franganillo B (1926) Aracnidos nuevos o poco conocidos de la Isla de Cuba. Boletin de Sociedad de Entomología de España 9:42-68.
  5. Crews S, Gillespie R (2010) Molecular systematics of Selenops spiders (Araneae: Selenopidae) from North and Central America: implications for Caribbean biogeography. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 101:288-322. doi: 10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01494.x

Images