Aenictus

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Borowiec M (2016) Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). ZooKeys (608) : 1–280, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2016-08-04, version 99687, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Aenictus&oldid=99687 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

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BibTeX:

@article{Borowiec2016ZooKeys,
author = {Borowiec, Marek L.},
journal = {ZooKeys},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)},
year = {2016},
volume = {},
issue = {608},
pages = {1--280},
doi = {10.3897/zookeys.608.9427},
url = {http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=9427},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2016-08-04, version 99687, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Aenictus&oldid=99687 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)
A1 - Borowiec M
Y1 - 2016
JF - ZooKeys
JA -
VL -
IS - 608
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.608.9427
SP - 1
EP - 280
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2016-08-04, version 99687, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Aenictus&oldid=99687 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/zookeys.608.9427

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Borowiec2016ZooKeys">{{Citation
| author = Borowiec M
| title = Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)
| journal = ZooKeys
| year = 2016
| volume =
| issue = 608
| pages = 1--280
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/zookeys.608.9427
| url = http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=9427
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2019-11-12

}} Versioned wiki page: 2016-08-04, version 99687, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Aenictus&oldid=99687 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Hymenoptera
Familia: Formicidae

Name

Aenictus Shuckard, 1840bWikispecies linkPensoft Profile

  • [[= Paraenictus|= Paraenictus]] Wheeler, W. M., 1929
  • [[= Typhlatta|= Typhlatta]] Smith, 1857

Type-species

Aenictus ambiguus, by original designation.
This Old World lineage contains some of the more conspicuous army ants and is the largest doryline genus with 183 described species.

Diagnosis

Worker. The workers of Aenictus be recognized by a combination of 8 to 10-segmented antennae, propodeal spiracle positioned high on the propodeum, and conspicuously binodal waist (abdominal segment IV is conspicuously the largest abdominal segment). Aenictus is most similar to the New World genus Neivamyrmex, which can be distinguished by 12-segmented antennae. Two other army ant genera co-occur with Aenictus: Aenictogiton and Dorylus. In Aenictogiton there are also constrictions between abdominal segments IV–VI, absent from Aenictus. Dorylus has a uninodal waist with no tapering towards the anterior of abdominal segment IV.
Male. The males of Aenictus are of decidedly army ant-like habitus and distinguishable from other dorylines by a combination of single segment in the waist, femora never extremely flattened relative to tibia, M·f1 vein of fore wing situated distal or near to cu-a, Rs·f2–3 absent, pterostigma broad and conspicuous. All New World army ant genera with similar habitus can be distinguished by fore wing venation, in particular presence of Rs·f2–3 and marginal cell closed along the leading edge by R·f3 connected to Rs·f5. In the Old World, Aenictogiton males can be easily told apart by their ‘hanging’ Rs·f2–3 vein in the fore wing, while Dorylus have a narrow pterostigma and dramatically flattened femora that contrast with tibiae that are more circular in cross-section.

Description

Worker. Head: Antennae with 8, 9, or 10 segments. Apical antennal segment not enlarged, not broader and longer than two preceding segments combined to moderately enlarged, broader than and about equal in length to two preceding segments combined. Clypeus with cuticular apron. Lateroclypeal teeth absent. Parafrontal ridges absent or reduced. Torulo-posttorular complex vertical. Antennal scrobes absent. Labrum with median notch or concavity. Proximal face of stipes not projecting beyond inner margin of sclerite, prementum exposed when mouthparts fully closed. Maxillary palps 2-segmented. Labial palps 2-segmented. Mandibles triangular, with teeth or with one median tooth, or falcate. Eyes absent. Ocelli absent. Head capsule with differentiated vertical posterior surface above occipital foramen; in some species differentiation weak. Ventrolateral margins of head without lamella or ridge extending towards mandibles and beyond carina surrounding occipital foramen. Posterior head corners dorsolaterally immarginate. Carina surrounding occipital foramen ventrally absent. Mesosoma: Pronotal flange not separated from collar by distinct ridge. Promesonotal connection with Pronotomesopleural suture completely fused. Pronotomesopleural suture completely fused; Aenictus philippinensis group species with grooved cuticular lip anteriorly. Mesometapleural groove not impressed to deeply impressed, conspicuous. Transverse groove dividing mesopleuron absent. Pleural endophragmal pit concavity absent. Mesosoma dorsolaterally immarginate. Metanotal depression or groove on mesosoma absent or present. Propodeal spiracle situated high on sclerite. Propodeal declivity with or without distinct dorsal edge or margin and triangular or broadly oval in posterior view. Metapleural gland with bulla visible through cuticle. Propodeal lobes present, short. Metasoma: Petiole anterodorsally marginate with carina low on anterior face, dorsolaterally immarginate, and laterally above spiracle immarginate or marginate. Helcium in relation to tergosternal Pronotomesopleural suture placed at posttergite and infraaxial. Prora forming a V-shaped protrusion or narrowed into anteriorly directed spine. Spiracle openings of abdominal segments IV–VI circular. Abdominal segment III anterodorsally immarginate, dorsolaterally immarginate. Abdominal segment III about half size of succeeding segment IV, which is strongly constricted at presegmental portion (binodal waist). Girdling constriction of segment IV present, i.e. pre- and postsclerites distinct. Cinctus of abdominal segment IV a gradual concavity, not gutter-like. Abdominal segment IV conspicuously the largest segment. Abdominal tergite IV not folding over sternite, and anterior portions of sternite and tergite equally well visible in lateral view. Girdling constriction between pre- and posttergites of abdominal segments V and VI absent. Girdling constriction between pre- and poststernites of abdominal segments V and VI absent. Pygidium small, reduced to narrow strip, without impressed medial field and simple, not armed with cuticular spines or modified setae. Hypopygium unarmed. Legs: Mid tibia with two spurs, one barbulate and one simple, or with two simple spurs. Hind tibia with two barbulate/simple spurs or with one barbulate and one pectinate spur. Hind basitarsus not widening distally, circular in cross-section. Posterior flange of hind coxa not produced as raised lamella. Metatibial gland present as oval patch of whitish cuticle to patch occupying at least half of tibia length. Metabasitarsal gland absent. Hind pretarsal claws simple. Polymorphism: Monomorphic to moderately polymorphic.
Male. Head: Antennae with 13 segments. Clypeus without cuticular apron. Parafrontal ridges absent. Torulo-posttorular complex vertical, reduced to vertical carina or entirely absent. Maxillary palps 2-segmented. Labial palps 1-segmented. Mandibles falcate. Ventrolateral margins of head without lamella or ridge extending towards mandibles and beyond carina surrounding occipital foramen. Carina surrounding occipital foramen ventrally absent. Mesosoma: Pronotal flange not separated from collar by distinct ridge. Notauli absent. Transverse groove dividing mesopleuron absent. Propodeal declivity reduced, without distinct dorsal edge or margin. Metapleural gland opening absent. Propodeal lobes absent. Metasoma: Petiole anterodorsally immarginate, dorsolaterally immarginate, and laterally above spiracle immarginate. Helcium in relation to tergosternal Pronotomesopleural suture placed at Pronotomesopleural suture and axial. Prora simple, not delimited by carina. Spiracle openings of abdominal segments IV–VI circular, oval, or slit-shaped. Abdominal segment III more than half size of succeeding segment IV; latter weakly constricted at presegmental portion (uninodal waist). Girdling constriction of segment IV absent, i.e. pre- and postsclerites indistinct. Cinctus of abdominal segment IV absent, not impressed. Girdling constriction between pre- and postsclerites of abdominal segments V and VI absent. Abdominal segment IV not conspicuously largest segment. Abdominal sternite VII simple. Abdominal sternite IX distally armed with two spines, with lateral apodemes about as long as medial apodeme, directed anteriorly (towards head). Genitalia: Cupula strap-like, very short relative to rest of genital capsule and of approximately equal length on both dorsal and ventral surfaces. Basimere broadly fused to telomere, basimere with no sulcus trace at junction, and ventrally with left and right arms separated. Telomere expanded at apex. Volsella variable. Penisvalva not flattened at apex, expanded. Legs: Mid tibia without spurs or with two simple spurs. Hind tibia without spurs or with two simple spurs. Posterior flange of hind coxa not produced as raised lamella. Metatibial gland absent. Metabasitarsal glands absent. Hind pretarsal claws simple. Wings: Tegula present, narrow, demilanceolate in shape. Vein C in fore wing present. Pterostigma broad. Abscissa R·f3 absent. Abscissae Rs·f2–3 absent. Cross-vein 2r-rs present, connected to Rs·f2–3&Rs·f4. Abscissae Rs·f4–5 differentiated into Rs·f4 and Rs·f5 by 2rs-m. Abscissa M·f2 in fore wing contiguous with Rs+M. Abscissa M·f4 in fore wing present, reaching or not reaching wing margin. Cross-vein 1m-cu in fore wing present. Cross-vein cu-a in fore wing present, arising from Cu and distal to, at or near M·f1. Vein Cu in fore wing present, with only Cu1 branch prominent. Vein A in fore wing with abscissae A·f1 and A·f2 present. Vein C in hind wing absent. Vein R in hind wing absent or present, extending past Sc+R but not reaching distal wing margin. Vein Sc+R in hind wing present. Abscissa Rs·f1 in hind wing present, contiguous with Rs·f2. Abscissa Rs·f2 in hind wing present, not reaching wing margin. Cross-vein 1rs-m in hind wing present, about as long as M·f1. Vein M+Cu in hind wing present. Abscissa M·f1 in hind wing present. Abscissa M·f2 in hind wing present. Cross-vein cu-a in hind wing present. Vein Cu in hind wing present. Vein A in hind wing with abscissae A·f1 and A·f2 present.
Gyne. Dichthadiiform, blind and with one or none ocelli, so far known in 13 species (Bharti 2003[1]).
Larva. Larvae of several Indomalayan and Australasian Aenictus species have been described (Wheeler 1943[2], Wheeler and Wheeler 1964b[3], 1984[4], 1990[5]). Cocoons are absent.

Distribution

Aenictus is widely distributed in the Old World. The vast majority of species is found in Southeast Asia, with the Afrotropics being the other center of diversity. A few species range into the southern parts of the Palearctic region, and there is a number of species known from Australia.

Taxonomy and phylogeny

The phylogenetic position of Aenictus has been difficult to infer. Phylogenomic data suggests that it is sister to the Aenictogiton plus Dorylus clade but they also show that these two lineages diverged very long ago, most likely in the Cretaceous (Borowiec, in prep.). The comprehensive morphology-based study of Brady and Ward (2005)[6] placed it sister to Aenictogiton plus Dorylus; subsequent molecular analyses recovered it sister to New World army ants (Brady et al. 2006[7]) and, later, sister to the Aenictogiton plus Dorylus clade, although with low support (Brady et al. 2014[8]). The internal phylogeny shows that the African species of Aenictus are nested within South East Asian forms (Munetoshi Maruyama pers. comm.; Borowiec, in prep.).
Aenictus was first described based on a male from India, named for its ‘aenigmatical structure’ by Shuckard (1840b)[9]. Shuckard correctly recognized its affinity to other doryline ants, but the worker caste was not known at the time. Frederick Smith (1857)[10] described a new genus based on workers, Typhlatta from Borneo, from material collected by Alfred Russell Wallace. It was not until 1890 that the male and workers of these ants were collected together (Forel 1890[11]c).
The trend of describing unassociated males unfortunately continued and Aenictus is an example of ‘dual taxonomy’. Many names are either worker- or male-based, and there is no single species known from workers, queens and males (Gotwald and Leroux 1980[12], Bolton 2003[13]). The internal phylogeny of the genus has been tackled with the cladistics analysis of Wilson (1964)[14] and a phenetic study of quantitative traits (Gotwald and Barr 1988[15]). As of this writing, Munetoshi Maruyama (pers. comm.) is working on a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the genus. The taxonomy of the Asian forms received most attention and was first the subject of a thorough revision of Wilson (1964)[14], recently followed by a long series of studies that described many new taxa and provided new keys for most of the species groups (Bharti et al. 2012[16], Jaitrong and Eguchi 2010[17], Jaitrong and Hashimoto 2012[18], Jaitrong and Nur-Zati 2010[19], Jaitrong and Wiwatwitaya 2013[20], Jaitrong and Yamane 2010[21], 2011a[22], 2012b[23], 2013[24], Jaitrong et al. 2010[25], 2011[26], 2012[27], Li and Wang 2005[28], Liu et al. 2015[29], Mathew and Tiwari 2000[30], Staab 2014a[31], Staab 2015[32], Terayama and Yamane 1989[33], Terayama and Kubota 1993[34], Wang 2006[35], Wong and Guénard 2016[36], Wiwatwitaya and Jaitrong 2011[37], Yamane and Hashimoto 1999[38], Yamane and Wang 2015, Zettel and Sorger 2010[39], Zhou 2001[40], Zhou and Chen 1999[41]). Jaitrong and Yamane (2011) established the current species-group classification and provided keys that make identifications in this large genus feasible. Shattuck (2008)[42] revised the Australian species. In contrast to the Asian fauna, the taxonomy of African species has been largely neglected and never received a comprehensive treatment. Because of the above mentioned ‘dual taxonomy’ it is even difficult to give an estimate of the total number of species in the Afrotropical region, although Wilson (1964)[14] estimated the number of species to be ‘at least 12’. Papers by Campione et al. (1983)[43], Gotwald and Cunningham-van Someren (1976)[44], and Gotwald and Leroux (1980)[12] are the only modern references discussing taxonomy of Afrotropical Aenictus. Several species of the genus reach the Palearctic region; recently Aktaç et al. (2004)[45] and Radchenko and Alipanah (2004)[46] discussed the West Palearctic species and Sharaf et al. (2012)[47] described an additional species from Saudi Arabia.

Biology

Given the number of described species and their abundance and importance as insect predators in the Old World tropics, the biology of Aenictus is poorly studied. The impressive species and morphological diversity is likely reflected in the diversity of habits, although all thus far observed species seem to be specialized predators of other ants (but see Staab 2014b[48] for a report on honeydew feeding). Members of some groups are known to form colonies of up to 80,000 individuals, forage above-ground in conspicuous columns and bivouac in semi-open spaces, while others are much more inconspicuous and cryptic. Aenictus queens synchronize brood production and colony life cycle goes through statary and nomadic phases (Schneirla and Reyes 1966[49]). The nomadic phase lasts on average 14 days, about the same amount of time as in the Neotropical genera, but the statary phase is much longer and lasts 28 days, as opposed to 20 days in Eciton. During the nomadic phase in Eciton the daily colony emigrations always follow raids, whereas in Aenictus they can be initiated after a time of quiescence and occur without regularity, often multiple times a day. The descriptions of foraging behavior for several species are available; Wilson (1964)[14] in his revision provides notes on foraging of selected species. Chapman (1965)[50] recounts observations of a few species in the Philippines, mostly Aenictus gracilis and Aenictus laeviceps, and Schneirla and Reyes (1966[49], 1969[51]) study these two epigaeic species in detail. Schneirla (1971)[52] compares raiding and emigration behavior of Aenictus laeviceps to other army ants, Eciton and Neivamyrmex.
Rościszewski and Maschwitz (1994)[53] and Hirosawa et al. (2000) studied prey specialization among sympatric Aenictus in Asia. Both studies found evidence of resource partitioning and observed differences in foraging strategies. Gotwald and Cunningham-van Someren (1976)[44] and Gotwald (1976)[54] are the only publications focusing on the behavior of African forms. At least some species support a community of myrmecophiles (Chapman 1965[50], Maruyama et al. 2009[55]).
Billen and Gotwald (1988)[56] described the anatomy of Dufour gland in three Asian Aenictus and argued that its structure, unusual among ants, shows affinity with Dorylus. Oldham et al. (1994)[57] characterized the trail pheromone of Aenictus species related to Aenictus laeviceps and demonstrated that it is produced by the postpygidial gland and Billen et al. (1999)[58] further studied the structure of this gland. Hölldobler et al. (1996)[59] described the histology and ultrastructure of the metatibial gland in Aenictus ceylonicus.

Species of Aenictus

Aenictus abeillei (André, 1886): Algeria
Aenictus acerbus Shattuck, 2008: Australia
Aenictus aitkenii Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus alluaudi Santschi, 1910c: Kenya
Aenictus alluaudi falcifer Santschi, 1924: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus alticola Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1930a: Philippines
Aenictus ambiguus Shuckard, 1840b: India
Aenictus anceps Forel, 1910b: Eritrea
Aenictus annae Forel, 1911a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus appressipilosus Jaitrong andYamane, 2013: Malaysia (Sabah)
Aenictus arabicus Sharaf and Aldawood, 2012: Saudi Arabia
Aenictus aratus Forel, 1900a: Australia
Aenictus artipus Wilson, 1964: Thailand
Aenictus arya Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus asantei Campione, Novak and Gotwald, 1983: Ghana
Aenictus asperivalvus Santschi, 1919a: Ivory Coast
Aenictus bakeri Menozzi, 1925: Philippines
Aenictus baliensis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Bali)
Aenictus bayoni Menozzi, 1932: Uganda
Aenictus binghami Forel, 1900a: Myanmar
Aenictus biroi Forel, 1907a: Sri Lanka
Aenictus bobaiensis Zhou and Chen, 1999: China
Aenictus bodongjaya Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus bottegoi Emery, 1899a: Ethiopia
Aenictus bottegoi noctivagus Santschi, 1913: Ethiopia
Aenictus brazzai Santschi, 1910: Republic of the Congo
Aenictus breviceps Forel, 1912b: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus brevicornis (Mayr, 1879): India
Aenictus brevinodus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Indonesia (Sulawesi)
Aenictus brevipodus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Vietnam
Aenictus buttelreepeni Forel, 1913c: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus buttgenbachi Forel, 1913a: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus camposi Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1925: Philippines
Aenictus carolianus Zettel and Sorger, 2010: Philippines
Aenictus certus Westwood, 1842: India
Aenictus ceylonicus (Mayr, 1866a): Sri Lanka
Aenictus changmaianus Terayama and Kubota, 1993: Thailand
Aenictus chapmani Wilson, 1964: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus clavatus Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus clavatus atripennis Forel, 1913c: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus clavatus kanariensis Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus clavatus sundaicus Forel, 1909c: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus clavitibia Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus clavitibia facetus Forel, 1911a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus concavus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus congolensis Santschi, 1911a: ‘Congo français’
Aenictus cornutus Forel, 1900a: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus crucifer Santschi, 1914a: Kenya
Aenictus crucifer tuberculatus Arnold, 1915: Zimbabwe
Aenictus currax Emery, 1900a: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus cylindripetiolus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus decolor (Mayr, 1879): ‘Ost-Afrika’
Aenictus dentatus Forel, 1911c: Malaysia (Negeri Sembilan)
Aenictus diclops Shattuck, 2008: Australia
Aenictus dlusskyi Arnol’di, 1968: Armenia
Aenictus doryloides Wilson, 1964: India
Aenictus doydeei Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011b: Laos,
Aenictus duengkaei Jaitrong and Yamane, 2012: Thailand
Aenictus eguchii Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Vietnam
Aenictus eugenii Emery, 1895a: South Africa
Aenictus eugenii caroli Forel, 1910b: Eritrea
Aenictus eugenii henrii Santschi, 1924: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus exilis Wilson, 1964: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus feae Emery, 1889: Myanmar
Aenictus fergusoni Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus foreli Santschi, 1919a: Ivory Coast
Aenictus formosensis Forel, 1913b: Taiwan
Aenictus fuchuanensis Zhou, 2001: China
Aenictus fulvus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Thailand
Aenictus furculatus Santschi, 1919a: Senegal
Aenictus furculatus andrieui Santschi, 1930: Sudan
Aenictus furibundus Arnold, 1959: Zimbabwe
Aenictus fuscipennis Forel, 1913c: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus fuscovarius Gerstäcker, 1859: Mozambique
Aenictus fuscovarius laetior Forel, 1910b: Eritrea
Aenictus fuscovarius magrettii Emery, 1892: Sudan
Aenictus fuscovarius sagittarius Santschi, 1938: Egypt
Aenictus gibbosus Dalla Torre, 1893: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus gibbosus ashaverus Forel, 1913c: Indonesia
Aenictus glabratus Jaitrong and Nur-Zati, 2010: Malaysia (Selangor)
Aenictus glabrinotum Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011: Malaysia (Sabah)
Aenictus gleadowii Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus gonioccipus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Sulawesi)
Aenictus gracilis Emery, 1893b: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus grandis Bingham, 1903: Myanmar
Aenictus gutianshanensis Staab 2014a[31]: China
Aenictus hamifer Emery, 1896d: Ethiopia/Somalia
Aenictus hamifer spinosior Stitz, 1917: Algeria
Aenictus henanensis Li and Wang, 2005: China
Aenictus hilli Clark, 1928: Australia
Aenictus hodgsoni Forel, 1901a: Myanmar
Aenictus hoelldobleri Staab, 2015: China
Aenictus hottai Terayama and Yamane, 1989: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus humeralis Santschi, 1910c: Mali
Aenictus humeralis chevalieri Santschi, 1910c: Senegal
Aenictus humeralis viridans Santschi, 1915: Benin
Aenictus huonicus Wilson, 1964: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus icarus Forel, 1911a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus icarus incautus Forel, 1911a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus idoneus Menozzi, 1928: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus inconspicuus Westwood, 1845: South Africa
Aenictus indicus Bharti, Wachkoo and Kumar, 2012: India
Aenictus inflatus Yamane and Hashimoto, 1999: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus itoi Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus jacobsoni Forel, 1909c: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus jarujini Jaitrong and Yamane, 2010a: Thailand
Aenictus javanus Emery, 1896a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus jawadwipa Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus khaoyaiensis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus kutai Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia
Aenictus laeviceps (Smith, F., 1857): Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus latifemoratus Terayama and Yamane, 1989: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus latiscapus Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus latiscapus fumatus Wheeler, W. M., 1927: China
Aenictus latiscapus sauteri Forel, 1913b: Taiwan
Aenictus leliepvrei Bernard, 1953a: Algeria
Aenictus leptotyphlatta Jaitrong and Eguchi, 2010: Thailand
Aenictus levior (Karavaiev, 1926): Indonesia (Buru Is.)
Aenictus lifuiae Terayama, 1984: Taiwan
Aenictus longi Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus longi taivanae Forel, 1913b: Taiwan
Aenictus longicephalus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Lombok)
Aenictus longinodus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2012: Thailand
Aenictus luteus Emery, 1892: Sierra Leone
Aenictus luteus moestus Santschi, 1930: Mali
Aenictus luzoni Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1925: Philippines
Aenictus maneerati Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus mariae Emery, 1895a: South Africa
Aenictus mariae natalensis Forel, 1901c: South Africa
Aenictus mauritanicus Santschi, 1910c: probably Morocco
Aenictus mentu Weber, 1942: South Sudan
Aenictus minimus Jaitrong and Hashimoto, 2012: Vietnam
Aenictus minipetiolus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Lombok)
Aenictus minutulus Terayama and Yamane, 1989: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus mocsaryi Emery, 1901c: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus moebii Emery, 1895b: Togo
Aenictus moebii sankisianus Forel, 1913a: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus montivagus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Malaysia (Sabah)
Aenictus mutatus Santschi, 1913: Ivory Coast
Aenictus mutatus pudicus Santschi, 1919a: Ivory Coast
Aenictus nesiotis Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1930b: Philippines
Aenictus nganduensis Wilson, 1964: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus nishimurai Terayama and Kubota, 1993: Thailand
Aenictus obscurus Smith, F., 1865: ‘New Guinea’
Aenictus orientalis (Karavaiev, 1926): Indonesia (Aru Is.)
Aenictus pachycerus (Smith, F., 1858): India
Aenictus pangantihoni Zettel and Sorger, 2010: Philippines
Aenictus paradentatus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2012: Thailand
Aenictus parahuonicus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Thailand
Aenictus peguensis Emery, 1895c: Myanmar
Aenictus pfeifferi Zettel and Sorger, 2010: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus pharao Santschi, 1924: Sudan
Aenictus philiporum Wilson, 1964: Australia
Aenictus philippinensis Chapman, 1963: Philippines
Aenictus piercei Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1930d: Philippines
Aenictus pilosus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Philippines
Aenictus pinkaewi Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus porizonoides Walker, 1860: Sri Lanka
Aenictus powersi Wheeler, W. M. and Chapman, 1930e: Philippines
Aenictus prolixus Shattuck, 2008: Australia
Aenictus pubescens Smith, F., 1859: India
Aenictus punctatus Jaitrong and Yamane, 2012: Brunei
Aenictus punctiventris Emery, 1901b: Indonesia (Laut Island)
Aenictus punctiventris scutellaris Forel, 1912d: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus punensis Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus rabori Chapman, 1963: Philippines
Aenictus raptor Forel, 1913a: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus reyesi Chapman, 1963: Philippines
Aenictus rhodiensis Menozzi, 1936: Greece
Aenictus rixator Forel, 1901: South Africa
Aenictus rotundatus Mayr, 1901: South Africa
Aenictus rotundatus guineensis Santschi, 1924: Guinea
Aenictus rotundatus merwei Santschi, 1932: South Africa
Aenictus rotundicollis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus rougieri André, 1893: Tunisia
Aenictus sagei Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus schneirlai Wilson, 1964: Papua New Guinea
Aenictus seletarius Wong and Guénard, 2016: Singapore
Aenictus shillongensis Mathew and Tiwari, 2000: India
Aenictus shuckardi Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus siamensis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Thailand
Aenictus silvestrii Wheeler, W. M., 1929: West Malaysia
Aenictus sirenicus Yamane and Wang, 2015: Malaysia (Sabah)
Aenictus sonchaengi Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Thailand
Aenictus soudanicus Santschi, 1910c: Senegal?
Aenictus soudanicus brunneus Forel, 1913a: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus spathifer Santschi, 1928: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus steindachneri Mayr, 1901: South Africa
Aenictus stenocephalus Jaitrong, Yamane and Wiwatwitaya, 2010: Thailand
Aenictus subterraneus Jaitrong and Hashimoto, 2012: Malaysia (Sabah)
Aenictus sulawesiensis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Sulawesi)
Aenictus sumatrensis Forel, 1913c: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus sumatrensis maxillosus Forel, 1913c: Indonesia (Sumatra)
Aenictus sundalandensis Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus thailandianus Terayama and Kubota, 1993: Thailand
Aenictus togoensis Santschi, 1915: Togo
Aenictus trigonus Forel, 1911a: Indonesia (Java)
Aenictus turneri Forel, 1900a: Australia
Aenictus vagans Santschi, 1924: Niger
Aenictus vaucheri Emery, 1915c: Morocco
Aenictus vieti Jaitrong and Yamane, 2010a: Vietnam
Aenictus villiersi Bernard, 1953b: Guinea
Aenictus watanasiti Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus wayani Jaitrong and Yamane, 2011a: Indonesia (Sulawesi)
Aenictus weissi Santschi, 1910: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Aenictus westwoodi Forel, 1901a: India
Aenictus wilaiae Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus wilsoni Bharti, Wachkoo and Kumar, 2012: India
Aenictus wiwatwitayai Jaitrong and Yamane, 2013: Thailand
Aenictus wroughtonii Forel, 1890: India
Aenictus wudangshanensis Wang, W., 2006: China
Aenictus yamanei Wiwatwitaya and Jaitrong, 2011: Malaysia (Sarawak)
Aenictus yangi Liu, Hita Garcia, Peng and Economo, 2015: China
Aenictus zhengi Zhang, 1995: China

Taxon Treatment

  • Borowiec, M; 2016: Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) ZooKeys, (608): 1-280. doi


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