Dactyloscirus

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Skvarla M, Fisher J, Dowling A (2014) A review of Cunaxidae (Acariformes, Trombidiformes): Histories and diagnoses of subfamilies and genera, keys to world species, and some new locality records. ZooKeys 418 : 1–103, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2014-06-20, version 53353, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Dactyloscirus&oldid=53353 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

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BibTeX:

@article{Skvarla2014ZooKeys418,
author = {Skvarla, Michael J., Fisher, J. Ray AND Dowling, Ashley P. G.},
journal = {ZooKeys},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {A review of Cunaxidae (Acariformes, Trombidiformes): Histories and diagnoses of subfamilies and genera, keys to world species, and some new locality records},
year = {2014},
volume = {418},
issue = {},
pages = {1--103},
doi = {10.3897/zookeys.418.7629},
url = {http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/7629/abstract},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2014-06-20, version 53353, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Dactyloscirus&oldid=53353 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - A review of Cunaxidae (Acariformes, Trombidiformes): Histories and diagnoses of subfamilies and genera, keys to world species, and some new locality records
A1 - Skvarla M, Fisher J
A1 - Dowling A
Y1 - 2014
JF - ZooKeys
JA -
VL - 418
IS -
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.418.7629
SP - 1
EP - 103
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2014-06-20, version 53353, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Dactyloscirus&oldid=53353 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/zookeys.418.7629

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Skvarla2014ZooKeys418">{{Citation
| author = Skvarla M, Fisher J, Dowling A
| title = A review of Cunaxidae (Acariformes, Trombidiformes): Histories and diagnoses of subfamilies and genera, keys to world species, and some new locality records
| journal = ZooKeys
| year = 2014
| volume = 418
| issue =
| pages = 1--103
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/zookeys.418.7629
| url = http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/7629/abstract
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2020-11-30

}} Versioned wiki page: 2014-06-20, version 53353, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Dactyloscirus&oldid=53353 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Trombidiformes
Familia: Cunaxidae

Name

Dactyloscirus Den Heyer, 1978Wikispecies linkPensoft Profile

Historical review

Tragardh (1905)[1] described Scirus inermis. Berlese (1916)[2] erected Dactyloscirus as a subgenus of Scirus to accommodate Scirus (Dactyloscirus) eupaloides. He also described Scirus dorcas but failed to recognize that they were congeneric. Oudemans (1922)[3] described Rosenhofia machairodus. Halbert (1923)[4] redescribed and figured Scirus inermis from Ireland. Sellnick (1926)[5] transferred Scirus inermis to Cunaxa. Vitzthum (1931)[6] raised Dactyloscirus to full generic status but later (1940-43) treated it as a subgenus. Thor and Willmann (1941)[7] again elevated Dactyloscirus to generic status and designated Dactyloscirus eupaloides as the type specimen; they also transferred Cunaxa inermis and Scirus dorcas to Dactyloscirus. Baker and Hoffmann (1948)[8] regarded Dactyloscirus as a senior synonym of Cunaxa. Smiley (1975)[9] synonymized Rosenhofia with Dactyloscirus. Zaher et al. (1975b)[10] reported Dactyloscirus inermis from Egypt (though they called it Cunaxa inermis). Den Heyer (1978a)[11] split Armascirus from Dactyloscirus and Cunaxa and raised the subfamily Cunaxinae to accommodate them, thus refining the definitions of all three genera. Den Heyer (1979a)[12] described Dactyloscirus condylus and Dactyloscirus dolichosetosus. Den Heyer (1980c)[13] erected the tribe Armascirini and made Dactyloscirus and Armascirus the sole representatives. Gupta and Ghosh (1980)[14] described Cunaxoides nicobarensis. Dactyloscirus pataliputraensis was described by Gupta (1981)[15]. Liang (1986)[16] described Dactyloscirus humuli from China. Shiba (1986)[17] described Dactyloscirus mesonotus. Michocka (1987)[18] reported Dactyloscirus inermis from Poland. Smiley (1992)[19] transferred Cunaxoides nicobarensis to Dactyloscirus (though see discussion below) and described Dactyloscirus mansoni, Dactyloscirus johnstoni, and Dactyloscirus poppi. Gupta (1992)[20] described Dactyloscirus bengalensis. Corpuz-Raros (1995)[21] described Dactyloscirus philippinensis, Dactyloscirus rosarioae,? and Dactyloscirus agricolus. Inayatullah and Shahid (1996)[22] described Dactyloscirus illutus, Dactyloscirus minys,? and Dactyloscirus orsi. Swift (1996)[23] described Dactyloscirus hoffmannae and Dactyloscirus smileyi from the Hawaiian Islands. Hu (1997)[24] reported Dactyloscirus inermis and Dactyloscirus humuli from China. Bashir and Afzal (2006a)[25] described Dactyloscirus imbecillus and Dactyloscirus manzoori. Bashir, Afzal, and Akbar (2005)[26] described Dactyloscirus kahrorensis. Corpuz-Raros (2008)[27] described Dactyloscirus discocondylus and Dactyloscirus trifidus. Skvarla and Dowling (2012)[28] described Dactyloscirus pseudophilippinensis. Den Heyer and Castro (2012)[29] described Dactyloscirus saopauloensis.

Diagnosis

Gnathosoma. Pedipalps 5-segmented, extend beyond the subcapitulum by at least the last segment, and end in a strong claw. An apophysis between the genua and tibiotarsi usually present. This apophysis long or short and generally ends in a bulbous, hyaline tip; it can, however, end in a tapering point as in Armascirus. This apophysis approximately equal between males and females or shorter in males. Basifemora and telofemora complemented with spine-like setae; these two segments fused, although a line remains visible and they can thus be differentiated. Subcapitulum complemented with 6 pairs of setae (hg1–4 and 2 pairs of adoral setae) and covered by integumental papillae that are either randomly distributed or form a polygonal, reticulated pattern.
Idiosoma, dorsal. Female dorsal idiosoma has at least one sclerotized plate that bears 2 pairs of setose sensillae (at and pt) and 2 pairs of simple setae (lps and mps). 0–4 other major plates and platelets present. All plates, if present, covered by integumental papillae that form a reticulated pattern. Integument between plates striated. 7 pairs of setae (c1–2, d1–h1) present. Each seta, when not on a major plate or platelet, surrounded by a minute platelet only slightly larger than the setal socket. Cupule im present, usually laterad or in the proximity of e1. Dorsal idiosoma of males similar except a single large plate complemented with c1–2, d1–e1 present.
Idiosoma, ventral. Coxae I and II often fused; coxae III and IV often fused. Setal formula for coxae I–IV 3-3-3-3 (including paracoxal seta). Genital plates each bear 4 setae; 2 pairs of genital papillae visible underneath the plates. Anal plates bear 1 pair of setae (ps1). 2 pairs of setae (ps2 and h2) associated with, but do not occur on, anal plates. Cupule ih present in close proximity to h2. Integument between plates striated and bears 5–7 pairs of additional setae. Ventral idiosoma of males similar except the coxae much more extensive. A sclerotized aedeagus often visible in association with the genital plates. Legs comparatively short, generally not exceeding ? the length of the body. Famulus on tarsi I enlarged and ends in a tri-tipped prong. Tarsi constricted apically, resulting in large tarsal lobes. Trichobothrium on leg tibia IV present. Ambulacral claws occur on either side of a 4-rayed empodium.

Key to adult female Dactyloscirus

(modified from Skvarla and Dowling 2012[28])
Smiley (1992)[19] transferred Cunaxoides nicobarensis to Dactyloscirus as Dactyloscirus nicobarensis (Gupta & Ghosh, 1980). However, later in the same work he attributes the same holotype (No. 3146/17) and same description (viz. Gupta and Ghosh 1980[14]:191) to Cunaxoides nicobarensis Gupta & Ghosh, 1980. The original description and illustration by Gupta and Ghosh clearly state the species in question has three pedipalpal segments, which precludes it from being assigned to Dactyloscirus. Smiley illustrated a Dactyloscirus with 5-segmented pedipalp “after Gupta and Ghosh 1980[14]” when discussing Dactyloscirus nicobarensis, though it looks like nothing in the publication. Because of this Dactyloscirus nicobarensis (Gupta and Ghosh 1980[14]) is declared nomen dubium.


Taxon Treatment

  • Skvarla, M; Fisher, J; Dowling, A; 2014: A review of Cunaxidae (Acariformes, Trombidiformes): Histories and diagnoses of subfamilies and genera, keys to world species, and some new locality records ZooKeys, 418: 1-103. doi

Images

Other References

  1. Tragardh I (1905) Acariden aus Agypten und dem Sudan. Results of the Swedish Zoological Expedition to Egypt and the White Nile, 1901, Part II: 5–8.
  2. Berlese A (1916) Centuria secunda di Acari nuovi. Redia 12(1): 125–177.
  3. Oudemans A (1922) Acarologische Aanteekeningen LXVIII (Acari van Sumatra). Entomologische Berichten 1 (Amsterdam) 6: 108–111.
  4. Halbert J (1923) Notes on Acari, with descriptions of new species. Journal of the Linnean Society 35: 363–392.
  5. Sellnick M (1926) Eine parasitische milbe aus dem Balaton-See. Archivum Balatonicum II: 173–177.
  6. Vitzthum H (1931) Familie 13: Cunaxidae. In: Kukenthal W Krumbach T (Eds) Handbuch der Zoologie, band 3. Walter De Gruyter and Co, Leipzig, 140–146.
  7. Thor S, Willmann C (1941) Eupodidae, Penthalodidae, Penthaleidae, Rhagidiidae, Pachygnathidae, Cunaxidae. In: Thor S Willmann C (Eds) Das Tierreich, Eine Zusammenstellung und Kennzeichung der rezenten Tierformen. Lieferung 71a. Walter De Gruyter and Co, Leipzig, 164–175.
  8. Baker E, Hoffmann A (1948) Acaros de la familia Cunaxidae. Anales de la Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas Mexico 5(3–4): 229–273.
  9. Smiley R (1975) A generic revision of the mites of the family Cunaxidae (Acarina). Annals of the Entomological Society of America 68(2): 227–244.
  10. Zaher M, Soliman Z, El-Bishlawy S (1975b) Studies on population dynamics of soil predaceous prostigmatid mites in Giza, Egypt. Zeitschrift fur angewandte entomologie 79: 440–443.
  11. Den Heyer J (1978a) Four new species of Armascirus gen. nov. (Prostigmata: Acari) from the Ethiopian Region. Journal of the Entomological Society of South Africa 41(2): 217–239.
  12. Den Heyer J (1979a) Notes on the cunaxid genus Dactyloscirus (Actinedida: Acarida) with descriptions of two new pecies from the Ethiopian Region. Phytophylactica 11: 87–98.
  13. Den Heyer J (1980c) A new classification system for the family Cunaxidae (Actinedida: Acarida). Publications of the University of the North Series A 23: 1–12.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Gupta S, Ghosh S (1980) Some prostigmatid mites (Acarina) from Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Records of the Zoological Survey of India 77: 189–213.
  15. Gupta S (1981) Some soil prostigmatid mites (Acarina) from Bihar. Progress in Soil Biology and Ecology in India. USA Technical Series No. 37, 93–99.
  16. Liang G (1986) A new species and a new record of the genus Dactyloscirus from Shanghai, China (Acarina: Cunaxidae). Entomotaxonomia 8(1–2): 159–161.
  17. Shiba M (1986) The mites of family Cunaxidae (Acarina: Prostigmata) in Japan II. Genera Armascirus Den Heyer and Dactyloscirus Berlese. Matsuyama Shinonome Tanki Daigaku kenkyu ronso 17: 151–163.
  18. Michocka S (1987) Mites (Acari) of the Bdellidae and Cunaxidae families in Poland. Monografie Fauny Polski 14: 1–127.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Smiley R (1992) The predatory mite family Cunaxidae (Acari) of the world with a new classification. Indira Publishing House, West Bloomington, Michigan, 356 pp.
  20. Gupta S (1992) Arachnida: Plant mites (Acari). In: Saha S (Ed) State Fauna Series 3, Fauna of West Bengal, Part 3. Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta, India, 61–211.
  21. Corpuz-Raros L (1995) Philippine predatory mites of the family Cunaxidae (Acari). 2. Genera Armascirus Den Heyer and Dactyloscirus Berlese. The Philippine Agriculturist 78(2): 159–173.
  22. Inayatullah , Shahid M (1996) Three new predatory mites of the genus Dactyloscirus Berlese (Acarina: Cunaxidae) from Pakistan. Sarhad Journal of Agriculture 12(5): 547–557.
  23. Swift S (1996) Two new species of Dacyloscirus (Acari: Prostigmata: Cunaxidae) in the Hawaiian Islands. Anales del Instituto de Biologia Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Series Zoologia 67(2): 225–237.
  24. Hu S (1997) Cunaxid mites recorded in China. Journal of Ninbo Teachers College 15(1): 56–59.
  25. Bashir M, Afzal M (2006a) Two new species of the genus Dactyloscirus (Acari: Cunaxidae) from Punjab Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Zoology 38(4): 273–278.
  26. Bashir M, Afzal M, Akbar S (2005) A new cunaxid mite of genus Pulaeus (Cunaxidae) from Punjab-Pakistan. Biologia (Pakistan) 51(2): 163–168.
  27. Corpuz-Raros L (2008) Additional species of Cunaxidae and first report of the subfamily Neobonzinae (Cunaxidae, Acari) from the Philippines. Asia Life Sciences 17(1): 71–89.
  28. 28.0 28.1 Skvarla M, Dowling A (2012) Some New Armascirine Cunaxids (Acari: Prostigmata: Cunaxidae) from the Eastern United States. Zootaxa 3194: 1–34.
  29. Den Heyer J, Castro T (2012) New Neotropical cunaxinae species (Acari: Prostigmata: Cunaxidae). Zootaxa 3265: 22–42.