Ptiloglossa tarsata

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This page should be cited as follows (rationale):
Sarzetti L, Genise J, Sánchez M, Farina J, Molina M (2013) Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile. Journal of Hymenoptera Research 33 : 63–82, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35962, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ptiloglossa_tarsata&oldid=35962 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

Citation formats to copy and paste

BibTeX:

@article{Sarzetti2013JournalofHymenopteraResearch33,
author = {Sarzetti, Laura C. AND Genise, Jorge F. AND Sánchez, M. Victoria AND Farina, Juan L. AND Molina, M. Alejandra},
journal = {Journal of Hymenoptera Research},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile},
year = {2013},
volume = {33},
issue = {},
pages = {63--82},
doi = {10.3897/JHR.33.5061},
url = {http://www.pensoft.net/journals/jhr/article/5061/abstract},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35962, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ptiloglossa_tarsata&oldid=35962 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile
A1 - Sarzetti L
A1 - Genise J
A1 - Sánchez M
A1 - Farina J
A1 - Molina M
Y1 - 2013
JF - Journal of Hymenoptera Research
JA -
VL - 33
IS -
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/JHR.33.5061
SP - 63
EP - 82
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35962, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ptiloglossa_tarsata&oldid=35962 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/JHR.33.5061

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Sarzetti2013Journal of Hymenoptera Research33">{{Citation
| author = Sarzetti L, Genise J, Sánchez M, Farina J, Molina M
| title = Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile
| journal = Journal of Hymenoptera Research
| year = 2013
| volume = 33
| issue =
| pages = 63--82
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/JHR.33.5061
| url = http://www.pensoft.net/journals/jhr/article/5061/abstract
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2020-01-19

}} Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35962, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ptiloglossa_tarsata&oldid=35962 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Hymenoptera
Familia: Apoidea
Genus: Ptiloglossa

Name

Ptiloglossa tarsata (Friese, 1900)Wikispecies linkPensoft Profile

Locality and nesting site

The observations on the biology and nest structure were carried out during January 25th–30th; March 10th–16th, 2011; and January 4th–14th, 2012 at Paraje La Florida (25°0.817'S, 65°33.534'W), Salta province, Argentina. Two nests were excavated at this locality, which is in a transitional habitat between rain and dry forest with a MAT around 17 C° and a MAP between 700 to 800 mm (Baudino 1995[1]). Two nests were found in a formerly plowed area in the surroundings of the establishment “La Florida”. The soil surface was flat and the cover was composed mostly of grasses and plants of Solanum sp. and Clematis sp. (Fig. 8). The soil consisted of clayish to silty material and was devoid of rocks. The first nest was located next to a fence below a Solanum sp. plant, whereas the entrance of the second nest was partially covered by grasses.

Daily activity

The foraging activity started about 07:00 am, with full daylight, when females were observed visiting flowers of Solanum sp. (Fig. 9). One female made successive foraging trips, remaining inside the nest around 10 minutes after each trip. Foraging trips lasted around 20 minutes. This activity continued until 02:00 pm when the female closed the entrance from inside. The females were inside the main tunnels when the nests were excavated.

Description of nests

The entrance of the first nest, circular and 1 cm in diameter, was located at the center of a tumulus, 5.8 cm in maximum diameter and 4 cm high. The tumulus was composed of unconsolidated soil (Fig. 10). The main tunnel, vertical and slightly sinuous, was 40–61 cm long, and 1 cm in maximum diameter (Fig. 11). The inner surface of the main tunnel showed horizontal and densely grouped scratches 1–3 cm long and 0.2 cm wide. These scratches were probably made by the female mandibles (Fig. 12). The cells (n: 12), found at depths of 37–44 cm, were vertical and disposed radially around the main tunnel. Open cells were connected to the main tunnel by horizontal laterals, 5–7 cm long. Laterals ended in a raised, curved, entrance tunnel connecting with the vertical portion of the cell (Figs 11, 13c and 19). Once lined and sealed, the distal part of the entrance tunnel became the curved neck of the cell (Fig. 13b). Each lateral tunnel ended in one or two entrance tunnels connected with cells occurring at the same depth (Fig. 19). Entrance tunnels connected to closed cells were filled with soil (Fig. 19). The vertical portion of a cell was 1.9–2.0 cm long and 0.9–1 cm in maximum diameter (n: 12). The neck was 0.6–0.8 cm in diameter (n: 12). The inner walls of the cells and the neck were smooth and lined with a whitish, semitransparent cellophane-like material that extended up to the closure (Fig. 14). The cell closure, made with soil material, showed a spiral pattern composed of three coils on the inside (Fig. 15). Some cells contained a white wad of cotton-like material. The first nest excavated contained nine cells: three with eggs, three with young larvae, two with mature larvae, and one unfinished empty cell (Fig. 19). The second nest contained four cells, each with an egg. The eggs were whitish, cylindrical and lightly curved, 3 mm long and 0.8 mm wide. They lay on top of the semiliquid provisions (Fig. 20). Young larvae were also whitish, curved, and almost completely submerged in the provisions. Full grown larvae, more yellowish, were found inside cocoons made of a brown, thin, translucent, and slightly coriaceous material. The cocoon operculum is located at the base of the curved neck and consists of a circular disk of translucent, amber, semi-rigid material (Fig. 16). Below the operculum were two more disks of similar structure and composition to it. SEM observations indicated that these three disks were woven structures composed of crossed, coalescent silk threads of different thickness that leave small circular holes of 0.14–0.15 mm in diameter among them (Figs 17 and 18).

Taxon Treatment

  • Sarzetti, L; Genise, J; Sánchez, M; Farina, J; Molina, M; 2013: Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile Journal of Hymenoptera Research, 33: 63-82. doi

Other References

  1. Baudino G (1995) Hidrogeología del valle de Lerma, Provincia de Salta, Argentina. Informe Final de Beca de Perfeccionamiento, CONICET. Inédito. Salta.

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