Ogdoconta cinereola

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This page should be cited as follows (rationale):
Metzler E, Knudson E, Poole R, J. Donald Lafontaine, Pogue M (2013) A review of the genus Ogdoconta Butler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Condicinae, Condicini) from North America north of Mexico with descriptions of three new species. ZooKeys 264 : 165–191, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2013-02-06, version 30471, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ogdoconta_cinereola&oldid=30471 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

Citation formats to copy and paste

BibTeX:

@article{Metzler2013ZooKeys264,
author = {Metzler, Eric H. AND Knudson, Edward C. AND Poole, Robert W. AND J. Donald Lafontaine, AND Pogue, Michael G.},
journal = {ZooKeys},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {A review of the genus Ogdoconta Butler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Condicinae, Condicini) from North America north of Mexico with descriptions of three new species},
year = {2013},
volume = {264},
issue = {},
pages = {165--191},
doi = {10.3897/zookeys.264.4060},
url = {http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/4060/abstract},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2013-02-06, version 30471, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ogdoconta_cinereola&oldid=30471 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - A review of the genus Ogdoconta Butler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Condicinae, Condicini) from North America north of Mexico with descriptions of three new species
A1 - Metzler E
A1 - Knudson E
A1 - Poole R
A1 - J. Donald Lafontaine
A1 - Pogue M
Y1 - 2013
JF - ZooKeys
JA -
VL - 264
IS -
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.264.4060
SP - 165
EP - 191
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2013-02-06, version 30471, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ogdoconta_cinereola&oldid=30471 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/zookeys.264.4060

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Metzler2013ZooKeys264">{{Citation
| author = Metzler E, Knudson E, Poole R, J. Donald Lafontaine, Pogue M
| title = A review of the genus Ogdoconta Butler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Condicinae, Condicini) from North America north of Mexico with descriptions of three new species
| journal = ZooKeys
| year = 2013
| volume = 264
| issue =
| pages = 165--191
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/zookeys.264.4060
| url = http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/4060/abstract
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2019-06-16

}} Versioned wiki page: 2013-02-06, version 30471, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Ogdoconta_cinereola&oldid=30471 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Lepidoptera
Familia: Noctuidae
Genus: Ogdoconta

Name

Ogdoconta cinereola (Guenée, 1852)Wikispecies linkPensoft Profile

Type material

Placodes cinereola was based on two syntypes from New York, USA, from the Boisduval and Doubleday collections. A single syntype, labeled "U. S. America, Doubleday, 46–110" with a handwritten label "Placodes cinereola", now extant in the BMNH from the Doubleday collection, is labeled and hereby designated as Lectotype to ensure the stability of the name. Walker based Miana atomaria on three syntypes from the United States that were in the BMNH. The syntypes could not be located in the BMNH and Hampson (1910)[1] does not list any types in his catalogue.

Diagnosis

Forewing is light fuscous brown, and the subterminal region (between the postmedial and subterminal lines) is suffused with a pinkish tinge. Medial and basal areas are minutely speckled with white. Antemedial line is an obscure, scalloped white line. Reniform and orbicular spots are obscure but often discernible by fine white outlines. Claviform spot is absent. Postmedial line is a white, almost straight, oblique line with a slight basally directed bend at CU2. Subterminal line is marked primarily as a brown shade terminating the pink suffusion of the subterminal region. Hind wing is suffused with brown. Males and females are similar in appearance, although the female hind wing usually is darker. Forewing length: 9.5–14.5 mm. This appears to be the only species in the genus with a clasper near the junction of the saccular and cucullar regions of the valve.

Distribution and biology

Ogdoconta cinereola is the only widely distributed and commonly collected species of Ogdoconta in eastern, central, and southwestern North America. It occurs from southern Ontario and Quebec south to southern Florida. At the western edge of its distribution, Ogdoconta cinereola occurs from Manitoba southward through the Great Plains of Nebraska and Iowa, south throughout most of Texas, and westward through southern New Mexico (Eddy County) to southeastern Arizona (Santa Cruz County). The distribution extends south to the state of Coahuila in northern Mexico. Reports of this species from British Columbia are based on a mislabeled specimen; several other species from the same collection, now in the CNC, are also mislabeled as to locality with the same “Vancouver, B.C.” label.
The larva of Ogdoconta cinereola was described by Coquillett (1880)[2], Hampson (1910)[1], Crumb (1956)[3], and Wagner et al. (2011)[4]. Wagner et al. (2011)[4] provided pictures of the larva. Recorded larval hosts include five plant families; Amaranthaceae, Asteraceae, especially Ambrosia spp. (ragweeds), Fabaceae, Labiatae, and Poaceae (Ashmead 1886[5], Crumb 1956[3], Tietz 1972[6], Robinson et al. 2002[7], Heppner 2003[8], Wagner et al. 2011[4], Robinson et al. 2012[9]).

Remarks

This moth is easy to identify because of the pink in the subterminal area of the forewing. The adults are generally common and occur from May to September in the north, to as early as April and as late as October, in Texas and Florida. The saturation of pink in the postmedial area is reduced in specimens from southern Arizona. The pink postmedial area in some individuals is wider. Varying portions of the basal area of some specimens is replaced with pink.

Taxon Treatment

  • Metzler, E; Knudson, E; Poole, R; J. Donald Lafontaine, ; Pogue, M; 2013: A review of the genus Ogdoconta Butler (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Condicinae, Condicini) from North America north of Mexico with descriptions of three new species ZooKeys, 264: 165-191. doi

Other References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Hampson G (1910) Catalogue of the Lepidoptera Phalaenae in the British Museum. Vol. IX, Catalogue of Noctuidae (Acronyctinae, part 3). British Museum of Natural History, London, England, 552 pp.
  2. Coquillett D (1880) Description of noctuid larvae. The North American Entomologist 1: 47.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Crumb S (1956) The Larvae of the Phalaenidae. U.S. Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin No. 1135: 356 pp.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Wagner D, Schweitzer D, Sullivan J, Reardon R (2011) Owlet Caterpillars of Eastern North America. Princeton University Press. Princeton, NJ, 576 pp.
  5. Ashmead W (1886) Report on insects injurious to garden crops in Florida. Submitted to Prof. C. V. Riley, U. S. Entomologist. Washington, DC. 21 p. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources/research-curation/projects/chalcidoids/pdf_X/Ashmea887.pdf [accessed 12 March 2012]
  6. Tietz H (1972) An Index to the Described Life Histories, Early Stages and Hosts of the Macrolepidoptera of the Continental United States and Canada. Allyn Museum of Entomology. Sarasota, Florida, 2 volumes, 1,041 pp.
  7. Robinson G, Ackery P, Kitching I, Beccaloni G, Hernandez L (2002) Hostplants of the Moth and Butterfly Caterpillars of American North of Mexico. Memoirs of the American Entomological Institute 69: 1-824.
  8. Heppner J (2003) Lepidoptera of Florida Part 1 Introduction and Catalog. Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas 17, 670 pp.
  9. Robinson G, Ackery P, Kitching I, Beccaloni G, Hernandez L (2012) HOSTS - A Database of the World’s Lepidopteran Hostplants. Natural History Museum. London, Great Britain. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosts [accessed 12 March 2012]

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