Cadeguala albopilosa

From Species-ID
Jump to: navigation, search
Notice: This page is derived from the original publication listed below, whose author(s) should always be credited. Further contributors may edit and improve the content of this page and, consequently, need to be credited as well (see page history). Any assessment of factual correctness requires a careful review of the original article as well as of subsequent contributions.

If you are uncertain whether your planned contribution is correct or not, we suggest that you use the associated discussion page instead of editing the page directly.

This page should be cited as follows (rationale):
Sarzetti L, Genise J, Sánchez M, Farina J, Molina M (2013) Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile. Journal of Hymenoptera Research 33 : 63–82, doi. Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35966, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Cadeguala_albopilosa&oldid=35966 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

Citation formats to copy and paste

BibTeX:

@article{Sarzetti2013JournalofHymenopteraResearch33,
author = {Sarzetti, Laura C. AND Genise, Jorge F. AND Sánchez, M. Victoria AND Farina, Juan L. AND Molina, M. Alejandra},
journal = {Journal of Hymenoptera Research},
publisher = {Pensoft Publishers},
title = {Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile},
year = {2013},
volume = {33},
issue = {},
pages = {63--82},
doi = {10.3897/JHR.33.5061},
url = {http://www.pensoft.net/journals/jhr/article/5061/abstract},
note = {Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35966, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Cadeguala_albopilosa&oldid=35966 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.}

}

RIS/ Endnote:

TY - JOUR
T1 - Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile
A1 - Sarzetti L
A1 - Genise J
A1 - Sánchez M
A1 - Farina J
A1 - Molina M
Y1 - 2013
JF - Journal of Hymenoptera Research
JA -
VL - 33
IS -
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/JHR.33.5061
SP - 63
EP - 82
PB - Pensoft Publishers
M1 - Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35966, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Cadeguala_albopilosa&oldid=35966 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.

M3 - doi:10.3897/JHR.33.5061

Wikipedia/ Citizendium:

<ref name="Sarzetti2013Journal of Hymenoptera Research33">{{Citation
| author = Sarzetti L, Genise J, Sánchez M, Farina J, Molina M
| title = Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile
| journal = Journal of Hymenoptera Research
| year = 2013
| volume = 33
| issue =
| pages = 63--82
| pmid =
| publisher = Pensoft Publishers
| doi = 10.3897/JHR.33.5061
| url = http://www.pensoft.net/journals/jhr/article/5061/abstract
| pmc =
| accessdate = 2020-01-19

}} Versioned wiki page: 2013-08-01, version 35966, https://species-id.net/w/index.php?title=Cadeguala_albopilosa&oldid=35966 , contributors (alphabetical order): Pensoft Publishers.</ref>

See also the citation download page at the journal.


Taxonavigation

Ordo: Hymenoptera
Familia: Apoidea
Genus: Cadeguala

Name

Cadeguala albopilosa (Spinola, 1851)Wikispecies linkPensoft Profile

Locality and nesting site

The observations were carried out during November, 4th, 2009 and February, 17th, 2011 at Bahia Mansa (43°7.467'S, 71°39.95'W), Parque Nacional Los Alerces, Chubut province, Argentina (Fig. 30). On November, 9th, 2009 a nesting site was also found along the route 235 (43°26.142'S, 72°10.017'W), near Yelcho Lake, Palena province (Region de Los Lagos), Chile. The nests were studied at the xeric Austrocedrus forest of Bahia Mansa (Parque Nacional Los Alerces) with a MAT around 8 C° and MAP around 1200 mm. The nesting site at Bahia Mansa was slightly sloped and the soil subsurface contained a thin ash layer produced by the Chaiten eruption of May 2008 (Figs 30 and 32). The soil cover was composed of grasses and short herbs (Figs 30 and 31). The nests, around 20 and located among grasses, were distributed in an area of 5 × 7 m. The soil, containing many rocks, roots and grass rhizomes, was composed of silt to very fine sandy material. Nests of sweat bees, aestivation chambers of earthworms, and feeding chambers of cicadas were also present. The Chilean locality along route 235 was a disturbed forest clearing composed of a dense grass cover. The area had some slopes with large rocks and trunks over the surface. Around 12 nests were distributed in an area of 6 × 1.5 m almost horizontal and partially covered by grasses. At both localities, closest nests were separated each other by 2–4 cm.

Daily activity

Beeswere observed removing soil from the nests during November, 4th 2009 from 09:00 am to 05:00 pm. In the second field trip, during February 2011, no activity was observed.

Description of nests

Three nests were excavated during November 2009 when bees were active. The entrance, circular, 0.5 cm in maximum diameter was at the center of a large unconsolidated tumulus (Fig. 31). It was composed of a mixture of soil material and ash, 3–3.5 cm in maximum diameter and 2.5 cm high. During February 2011, when no activity of bees was observed, a piece of soil from the nesting site was extracted and taken to the laboratory for examination with a tomograph. The tomographic images provided a more precise picture of the nests and cells (Figs 35–37). The main tunnel, circular in cross section, was plugged with soil 2–3 cm below the entrance and descended vertically, straight or more sinuously among rocks (Fig. 22). It was 18–20 cm long and 0.5 cm in maximum diameter. The cells, found at a depth of 18–20 cm, were vertical and connected to the main tunnel by lateral ones, which were 2.5–3 cm long and mainly horizontal or gently curved (Fig. 23). They were filled with soil when connected to closed cells. At the distal end, lateral tunnels curved downwards, 90° or less, and were connected with the vertical portion of the cell. Once lined and sealed, the more distal curved part of the lateral tunnel connected to the cell became its curved neck (Figs 33 and 34). Each lateral tunnel ended in one or two cells ocurring at the same depth (Fig. 22). The number of cells per nest ranged from 2 to 4 in the studied nests (n: 4). The vertical portion of the cells was 1.3–1.6 cm long and 0.6–0.9 cm in maximum diameter (n: 12). The neck was 0.5 cm in diameter (n: 5). The inner walls of the cells and the neck were smooth and lined with a whitish semitransparent cellophane-like material. Cells studied on November contained eggs laying on the surface of the semiliquid provisions. The eggs whitish, cylindrical and slightly curved were 2 mm long and 0.7 mm wide. Cells studied on February contained white pupae inside their cocoons. The cocoons were composed of a brown, translucent, thin, and slightly coriaceous material. The cocoon operculum, located at the base of the curved neck, was composed of one translucent, amber, and semi-rigid circular disk, 5.0–5.5 mm in diameter (n: 2). This disk was a woven structure composed of crossed silk threads of different thickness that leave small circular holes. Below the operculum there was a net of silk threads loosely arranged, similar to the filter-like structure observed by Rozen (1984)[1] in the cocoon of various species of Diphaglossinae. Beneath the filter-like structure there was another disk with a similar microstructure to the operculum, but dome-shaped. It was called the ceiling of the pupation chamber by Rozen (1984)[1].

Taxon Treatment

  • Sarzetti, L; Genise, J; Sánchez, M; Farina, J; Molina, M; 2013: Nesting behavior and ecological preferences of five Diphaglossinae species (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Colletidae) from Argentina and Chile Journal of Hymenoptera Research, 33: 63-82. doi

Other References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rozen J (1984) Nesting biology of Diphaglossine bees (Hymenoptera, Colletidae). American Museum Novitates 2786: 1-33.

Images